donthideposter_141x200Around 35,000 people are diagnosed with bowel cancer every year in the UK. Current statistics suggest that around half of these will die.

Why?

Because the majority of people do not seek medical advice until their cancer is advanced, making treatment more difficult and a successful outcome less likely.

Bowel Cancer Isle of Man is an IOM registered charity which aims to raise awareness of bowel cancer, its symptoms and risks, and provide local support to those people in the Island affected by this terrible but preventable disease. Bowel cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Europe. Around 25 people in the Isle of Man die from the disease every year, however many of these lives could be saved by early detection and treatment.

When it was founded in 2009 Bowel Cancer Isle of Man lobbied for the introduction of an Isle of Man bowel screening programme. This resulted in a screening programme being rolled out to all Island residents aged 60 to 69 and now extended to 75. Older residents can also request screening free of charge by phoning 0800 707 6060. The screening programme has already saved lives here and proved its worth – 14 cancers were detected in the first 2 year screening cycle and treated successfully. With an increased uptake this figure could be significantly increased. Bowel Cancer IOM can help with queries on 07624 480973. All monies donated to Bowel Cancer Isle of Man stay in the Island.

The main aims of Bowel Cancer Isle of Man (BCIOM) are to:

  • encourage people to talk openly about the disease by “breaking the poo taboo”
  • raise awareness of the symptoms and promote early diagnosis
  • provide practical and emotional support to bowel cancer patients and their families in the Isle of Man
  • fund charitable projects for the benefit of persons suffering from bowel cancer in the Isle of Man

IOM Council of Cancer Charities

Bowel Cancer IOM is an active member of the IOM Council of Cancer Charities. The Council’s Mission is to provide a forum for the Island’s leading cancer charities to communicate and co-ordinate their efforts so as to influence services, improve outcomes, and increase overall benefits to cancer patients and their carers, both on the Island and elsewhere. The Council of Cancer Charities was established in April 2000.  For further details see    http://www.ccciom.org/